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Stocks for 2018
Dian
Posted: 23 December 2017 10:59:09(UTC)
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Finally, 2017 was not as bad as some predicted. 2018 should become a mixed year. Volatility could become a norm. For me one of the options for 2018 is targeting fundamentally sound individual companies separated from the broader market. Some regions like Europe, Asian emerging and frontier markets were more attractively valued than their US counterparts as of late 2017. However, still selected individual US stocks could do well.

Just like in 2017, I found following predictions for 2018

Bears are predicting stock market doom in 2018
Stock market volatility to return in 2018
Another bull market in 2018

What would be your winning stocks/ ETFs for 2018? Do you think sector rotation is a good strategy to consider?

Could there be sell-off in overvalued stocks markets?

What I like most for 2018: Great value stocks, growth stories and out of favour markets in previous years.
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Bonita Trevino on 30/12/2017(UTC)
kWIKSAVE
Posted: 23 December 2017 12:06:15(UTC)
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Hoping WPP will make a comeback if a bit slow

My top pick would be Prudential for the longer term

For the medium term RPC (Plastic bottles)

For the short term Whitbread
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dyfed on 23/12/2017(UTC), Jim S on 23/12/2017(UTC)
dyfed
Posted: 23 December 2017 14:25:15(UTC)
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kWIKSAVE;54572 wrote:


For the medium term RPC (Plastic bottles)



Doesn't look good to me: there is a real environmental back-lash starting against plastic packaging and single-use plastic bottles (and about time too).
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chazza on 30/12/2017(UTC), Fiona D. on 17/01/2018(UTC), c brown on 21/02/2018(UTC)
jeffian
Posted: 23 December 2017 14:39:01(UTC)
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Kwiksave's shorthand use of 'plastic bottles' is actually misleading. RPC stands for Reinforced Plastic Containers and the company specialises in injection-moulding of plastic for a variety of uses including the design and production of containers for perfume and cosmetics, moulded containers to protect fruit etc., asthma inhalers and so on and so forth. I don't know whether they make bottles but, if they do, it's not a significant part of the business. They are alert to the environmental issues and working on sustainability.
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gillyann on 24/12/2017(UTC)
Mr Helpful
Posted: 23 December 2017 14:52:31(UTC)
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Dian;54568 wrote:

1. What would be your winning stocks/ ETFs for 2018?
2. Do you think sector rotation is a good strategy to consider?
3. Could there be sell-off in overvalued stocks markets?
4. What I like most for 2018: Great value stocks, growth stories and out of favour markets in previous years.


1. Sorry cannot foresee.
If it sheds light, cheapest on the risk-side of our portfolio :-
+ BRCI Commodities Income
+ HFEL Far East Income
Cheapest on the tentative 'defensive'-side of our portfolio :-
+ LAND Land Securities
But nothing to stop any of these getting cheaper !

2. A firm maybe.
3. There certainly will IMHO be a Stock sell-off one day from present elevated valuations, but sadly have no idea as to when.
4. Thanks : keep us informed on ideas/progress
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Dian on 24/12/2017(UTC)
laang lee
Posted: 23 December 2017 15:26:26(UTC)
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Thinking of an earlier post, talking of conversations earlier in the year,
RCP was often mentioned at about this time. Since then we have had one of the most influential tv programmes ever. David Attenborough will be on repeat for another 20 years.
I go scuba diving. The amount of plastic when I started was negligible compared to now.

I also pick up rubbish in a local parking spot, in the hedge etc. and the bins. The biggest single item is plastic water bottles. A bit less, for all the pop bottle brands combined. Quite a few cans.

So I can see why a maker of plastic water, and similar bottles would be a profitable investment. (This is a financial site, not environmental, I know.)
Manufacturers of plastic packaging will continue.
I heard about packaging made from mushrooms many years ago, and it has been mentioned recently. How much is actually produced.? Where is a billionaire angel investor.?
I remember plastic bags that crumbled away in a few months. But (guess) this powder turned into micro-particles. We will hear a lot about micro-particles of plastic in the future.

Never bought a bottle of water in England, but I have in the Far East, though do drink tap water.
with no ill effect. The pollution in the Far East makes Victorian England look healthy.
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Dian on 24/12/2017(UTC), martin hargan on 28/12/2017(UTC)
laang lee
Posted: 23 December 2017 15:31:54(UTC)
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Jeffian's post noted, mine not directed at RCP. I came in from litter clearing, and sat here with a cuppa, then saw the post. Next time, I,ll finish my tea before commenting.
dyfed
Posted: 23 December 2017 16:00:09(UTC)
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jeffian;54578 wrote:
Kwiksave's shorthand use of 'plastic bottles' is actually misleading. RPC stands for Reinforced Plastic Containers and the company specialises in injection-moulding of plastic for a variety of uses including the design and production of containers for perfume and cosmetics, moulded containers to protect fruit etc., asthma inhalers and so on and so forth. I don't know whether they make bottles but, if they do, it's not a significant part of the business. They are alert to the environmental issues and working on sustainability.


Yes, clocked that, but don't you think it'll start with plastic bottles and work out from there? I can see plastic for any food packaging declining and disappearing. And bet you cosmetics and perfume will soon be promoting pretty glass bottles or similar.
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laang lee on 25/12/2017(UTC), Fiona D. on 17/01/2018(UTC)
Julianw
Posted: 23 December 2017 16:03:19(UTC)
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My crystal ball is always cloudy.

I find very liberating to admit I do not know!
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Chris Howland on 23/12/2017(UTC), Dian on 24/12/2017(UTC)
Alan Selwood
Posted: 23 December 2017 17:06:33(UTC)
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Well done, all litter pickers! You are an example to others.

With all the above comments about plastic, recycling, damage to the environment, etc., it's instructive to think about both David Attenborough's comments about plastics in the sea AND what is in your own dustbins AND where and how any rubbish is either dumped or recycled, and into what.

Having seen programmes on TV about horrendous pollution of the Ganges, plastics in the sea, and what happens to recycling products in India, I think there is a real need for co-ordinated global action, and an attitude of 'The buck stops here'. Some sort of joined-up thinking that does not depend on 'cheapest is best' or 'follow the rules blindly even when it's obvious that this is harmful' is really needed.

My own dustbins are usually (per fortnight) : 1 small bin about two-thirds full, 1 large green waste bin full to the brim for about 9 months of the year, 1 large glass/paper/plastics bin full to the brim every month of the year. Most of the small bin content is plastic film, plastic packaging like bubblewrap, and other items that our local recycling plant cannot handle. It is probably 50% items that could be recycled via proper incineration, subject to the incinerator passing all the clean air rules in reality as well as in theory.

This is additional to regular trips to my compost bins with green kitchen waste and shreddings (my neighbour's go in them too!), and the 4 builder's bags of this year's leaves waiting to rot down.

Humans do seem to create far too much waste and exhaust too much land and water of their normal contents!

6 users thanked Alan Selwood for this post.
Jim S on 23/12/2017(UTC), Dian on 24/12/2017(UTC), martin hargan on 28/12/2017(UTC), Alan M on 29/12/2017(UTC), chazza on 30/12/2017(UTC), Fiona D. on 17/01/2018(UTC)
Dian
Posted: 24 December 2017 07:55:44(UTC)
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Did anybody think about investing in environmentally friendly stocks?

Mr Helpful wrote:

Quote:
1. Sorry cannot foresee.
If it sheds light, cheapest on the risk-side of our portfolio :-
+ BRCI Commodities Income
+ HFEL Far East Income
Cheapest on the tentative 'defensive'-side of our portfolio :-
+ LAND Land Securities
But nothing to stop any of these getting cheaper !

2. A firm maybe.
3. There certainly will IMHO be a Stock sell-off one day from present elevated valuations, but sadly have no idea as to when.
4. Thanks : keep us informed on ideas/progress


I am wary about overvalued stocks, bit coin and gold. They may have volatility and sell-off. I may be right or wrong. Rising interest rates is not favoring companies with huge debt. It is going to be stock pickers’ market. I prefer overlooked stocks.

http://www.thisismoney.c...eat-stock-boom-end.html

https://www.marketwatch....tory-in-2018-2017-12-18
kWIKSAVE
Posted: 24 December 2017 09:39:31(UTC)
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Let us not hammer RPC Group too much. They are very much aware of the environmental issues as follows.


RPC’s Position
Plastic is too valuable a material to be discarded. Littering both on land and in the marine
environment is not acceptable.
RPC will support initiatives that focus on a reduction in the impact of litter as a consequence
of consumer behaviour. RPC will also work to ensure that on site waste management is
sufficient in ensuring plastic, in the form of pellets, is not littered. An example of this is the
campaign entitled ‘Operation Clean Sweep’ of which RPC is a signatory. This initiative aims to
reduce pellet loss to the environment from plastic conversion operations.
RPC will also work to encourage the increased recycling of plastic items as an alternative end-of-life option to littering.
Dian
Posted: 25 December 2017 09:49:15(UTC)
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Overlooked markets like Poland, Korea and Austria were top winners in 2017. Their stock markets returned investors over 30% per cent. As a region East European frontier markets have done well in 2017. Which markets and region will give the highest return in 2018?
kWIKSAVE
Posted: 25 December 2017 12:18:59(UTC)
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Dian

Do you mean the highest return in sterling ?

Only one can give the highest.

Possibly European (ex-UK) Smaller Companies while the pound is still languishing.
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Dian on 26/12/2017(UTC)
Dian
Posted: 26 December 2017 09:33:10(UTC)
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kWIKSAVE

I was referring to stock market wise. Weak pound is good news for UK export companies.
Mr J
Posted: 26 December 2017 10:47:05(UTC)
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RPC may be very much aware, but that statement is just PR. In my view it rather despicably seeks to transfer responsibility to the consumer who often times has no choice but to purchase plastic packaging. In the whole consumers are lazy, ignorant and careless - but that is not a reason to blame them. The problem needs to be dealt with at source and companies like RPC should be introducing truly biodegradable alternatives. If they just keep making plastic containers they are part of the problem not the solution.
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James Wood on 27/12/2017(UTC), Fiona D. on 17/01/2018(UTC)
Milo Don
Posted: 26 December 2017 12:15:55(UTC)
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I always ask for my water and paint to be sold to me in paper tissues...

RPC are one of the good (or better than some) guys. They make bins from recycled plastics, compostable coffee capsules, stuff from bamboo derived bio-polymers etc. They are not particularly big in the plastic water bottle segment.

Dulux aren't going to go back to metal paint pots and food companies aren't going to go back to glass bottles and metal toothpaste tubes in any hurry.
Consumers need to take responsibility for their consumption habits. If anyone feels strongly enough that it is wrong for supermarkets to sell chicken drumsticks in a plastic tray they should go to the butcher and get them loose. "I haven't got time to shop like that and the awful capitalist pigs make me buy plastic packaging" isn't going to change anything and is a feeble excuse anyway.

Councils need to do more on the recycling front - mine doesn't accept 'food containers' for example, which is a pretty broad exclusion - but criticising RPC for making products that its clients demand whilst absolving consumers of any responsibility, and ignoring RPC's significant efforts in recycling and environmentally friendly development is unhelpful (to say the least).

Happy Boxing Day.
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jeffian
Posted: 26 December 2017 12:37:37(UTC)
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"Councils need to do more on the recycling front"

Indeed. Here in my London Borough we try earnestly to do exactly as instructed, keeping several different containers into which we put the appropriate materials (following such minutiae as plastic milk bottles being recyclable but their plastic tops not!), everything is washed and thoroughly cleaned to ensure no contamination, cardboard and waste paper is separated and packaged.........and then we watch as the bin men throw the whole lot into the crusher to be smashed into a pulp of broken glass and mess fit only for landfill. What is the point?
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Mickey on 26/12/2017(UTC), James Wood on 27/12/2017(UTC)
dyfed
Posted: 26 December 2017 12:43:23(UTC)
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Re RPC
IMHO plastics manufacturers will get squeezed in the medium term.
Plastics are getting unpopular in many quarters so volume is likely to decline. Manufacturers will presumably have to invest a fair amount in R&D to support improved sustainability whether through recycling, biodegradable plastics or whatever.
I also note from the Guardian (!) that the US has a number of big new plastics plants, so anything that is worth transporting across the globe may also face increased price competition.
If RCP follow through on sustainability initiatives of various sorts they could come out with a strong competitive edge, but this is by no means guaranteed.
Just saying...
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James Wood on 27/12/2017(UTC)
Mr J
Posted: 27 December 2017 01:33:59(UTC)
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Sorry Milo, I can’t agree that plastics is a consumer problem and needs to be fixed by changing consumer behavior. I think it’s wrong to believe you can get several billion members of the human species that are naturally lazy, selfish and ignorant to become energetic waste sifters and sorters and to go back to buying water in a bucket, unwashed vegetables of assorted sizes etc etc. The secret to problem solving is to work with human nature and not against it.

Some things like the environment and national defense and such like are what economists call public goods - individuals are not themselves motivated to provide them because if they pay for them themselves all their fellow humans get the benefit while refusing to pay their individual share. Hence the state must have an active role in providing these things.

You may not have heard of the Japanese term poka yoke - design things so that they can only be used in the correct way - e.g. an ammonia bottle with a top that a child physically cannot open etc. This is what we need, packaging that cannot end up in the environment because it is made to self destruct.

We need an industry which is incentivized to provide biodegradable packaging - a tax on plastics and non biodegradeables would be a good start. The only reason everything has become plastic and the glass milk bottles and paper bags are gone is because plastic is cheap, cheap, cheap for companies to use. Companies seek profit - therefore they use plastic because it is cheaper.

You will not get humans to give up on preferring to buy food that is pre-washed and graded and attractively packaged. Work with the grain of humans not against it by incentivizing the use of alternatives. Tax plastic and force producers to apply a large skull and cross bones to it saying - plastic is destroying your planet.

Man can walk on the moon, split sub-atomic particles, and edit its own genome. Man can surely produce biodegradable packaging, all that is required is the incentives to do so.


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