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While you were out
Nigel G
Posted: 09 August 2017 13:53:44(UTC)
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The latest wizard wheeze appears to be the use of fake Royal Mail missed delivery cards. They claim that an item is being held at one of their depots and provide a telephone number to book a redelivery. Personal details will then be requested.

http://www.telegraph.co....ake-royal-mail-letters/

Apparently, the RM logo is missing from the cards, but I'm sure it won't be long for that to change.
Micawber
Posted: 09 August 2017 14:12:22(UTC)
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There are so many of these types of scam.

Your basic safety measure is NEVER to use details in a phone call, email, or letter that you have not yourself solicited, to respond to the purported institution contacting you. Go and look it up on the web at your own initiative before acting.
Alan Selwood
Posted: 09 August 2017 15:49:27(UTC)
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I'm told that there is also a fake bank card reader scam, where someone sends you an unsolicited 'reader', then rings up about it, whereupon the victim says 'I don't want it', and is told to put the bank card in and the PIN number "so that it can be cancelled".

Naturally, all is not what it seems, and the bank account gets emptied, presumably by the 'reader' having a built-in network card that sends the data to the fraudsters.

Then there is the "I've changed my bank account" email, so that the victim sends the money owed to his/her builder to the fraudsters' own account, which is quickly emptied and closed.

Similar things have happened in house purchases, where the conveyancing firm's email is hacked, so that the house purchase money goes to fraudsters instead of the solicitor.

Always worth checking with the real people precisely what the current position is before sending off money! (What are the odds, really, of a bank account being changed just at that moment? Slim!!)
1 user thanked Alan Selwood for this post.
Tim D on 09/08/2017(UTC)
Tyrion Lannister
Posted: 10 October 2017 23:44:50(UTC)
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Alan Selwood;49672 wrote:
I'm told that there is also a fake bank card reader scam, where someone sends you an unsolicited 'reader', then rings up about it, whereupon the victim says 'I don't want it', and is told to put the bank card in and the PIN number "so that it can be cancelled".

Naturally, all is not what it seems, and the bank account gets emptied, presumably by the 'reader' having a built-in network card that sends the data to the fraudsters.

Then there is the "I've changed my bank account" email, so that the victim sends the money owed to his/her builder to the fraudsters' own account, which is quickly emptied and closed.

Similar things have happened in house purchases, where the conveyancing firm's email is hacked, so that the house purchase money goes to fraudsters instead of the solicitor.

Always worth checking with the real people precisely what the current position is before sending off money! (What are the odds, really, of a bank account being changed just at that moment? Slim!!)


Not slim enough!

I thought I was immune to scams but got caught out.

My credit card provider swapped me to another card which was infuriating for all the obvious reasons. About a week later, I got an email from a scammer disguised as Netflix saying that I needed to update my details as my card had been refused. It made perfect sense as I had a new card number. I was busy at the time so quickly gave them my new card number, expiry date and security code, nothing more than you're usually asked for. Low and behold, I was called by the credit card provider soon after as they suspected fraud on my card - which is exactly what had happened.

The email and fake website were very good copies but what I didn't check was the website address, a quick glance would've told me something was amiss.

At the very least, I always check the website address before I enter details, if nothing else it should start with https as opposed to the usual http.

This caught me out by pure chance, the timing from the scammers perspective wasn't luck - they'd probably have sent millions of emails and chances are that that someone's circumstances would've been perfect for lowering their guard. It's the opposite of winning the lottery, unlikely but it could be you.

Luckily, my losses were refunded, but I'm taking no chances from now on, no matter how busy I am.
4 users thanked Tyrion Lannister for this post.
Mickey on 11/10/2017(UTC), Darrener2 on 11/10/2017(UTC), Tim D on 11/10/2017(UTC), B B on 07/11/2017(UTC)
Micawber
Posted: 11 October 2017 08:59:36(UTC)
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I make it a principle never to click through from an unsolicited email to any link requiring action, even if on inspection the email appears to be from e.g. my bank. That includes some (genuine as it turned out) emails from the bank asking me to do a survey.

Likewise I never respond directly to any unsolicited phone call even if it is or purports to be from a credit card security team. I would phone them - from a different phone to avoid the hang-up scam, after checking the number online or on the back of my card.
2 users thanked Micawber for this post.
Jeff Liddiard on 11/10/2017(UTC), Tim D on 11/10/2017(UTC)
Tyrion Lannister
Posted: 11 October 2017 09:30:39(UTC)
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Micawber;51835 wrote:
I make it a principle never to click through from an unsolicited email to any link requiring action, even if on inspection the email appears to be from e.g. my bank. That includes some (genuine as it turned out) emails from the bank asking me to do a survey.

Likewise I never respond directly to any unsolicited phone call even if it is or purports to be from a credit card security team. I would phone them - from a different phone to avoid the hang-up scam, after checking the number online or on the back of my card.


You have a good policy Micawber. However, in my case I was a actually expecting an unsolicited email as my monthly subscription was due.
Jim Thompson
Posted: 11 October 2017 13:31:58(UTC)
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By carpet bombing the public, someone out of the thousands contacted will respond.

I must admit to be duped by a text asking for money, it sounds daft, but when you have a toxic combination of a stressful morning at work, short of time, distracted by my lunch falling all over the cab floor(!), and plausible information offered...

'Hi its (girls name which just happened to tally with my sisters name), I am in hospital, I fell over walking the dogs (she has dogs). Can you top up this phone I am borrowing as I need to call mum.'

It didn't take me long to suss out what was going on after I called our mother. I only lost £20. lesson learned.
Tim D
Posted: 11 October 2017 14:23:04(UTC)
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Jim Thompson;51846 wrote:
I must admit to be duped by a text asking for money, it sounds daft, but when you have a toxic combination of a stressful morning at work, short of time, distracted by my lunch falling all over the cab floor(!), and plausible information offered...

'Hi its (girls name which just happened to tally with my sisters name), I am in hospital, I fell over walking the dogs (she has dogs). Can you top up this phone I am borrowing as I need to call mum.'

It didn't take me long to suss out what was going on after I called our mother. I only lost £20. lesson learned.


I've observed first hand a couple of instances of this sort of thing where the scammer had access to one individual's facebook account, and proceeded to hit on their relatives (using facebook's builtin chat) with appeals for wire-transferred funds because of some desperate emergency. The fact facebook gave them access to quite an amount of shared history and personal details meant they could be fairly convincing (much more so than a random number caller could ever have hoped to be). It was interesting to observe how quickly people abandon common sense when they think there's a relative in trouble, and the scammer seemed to be quite skilled at whipping up a sense of panic and urgency in the victims. Fortunately cooler heads prevailed.
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