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Is it possible to make a good income online?
Nancy Jones
Posted: 15 April 2016 06:51:04(UTC)
#27

Joined: 22/03/2016(UTC)
Posts: 2

Great job! I also make money through Earn Honey by playing games , watching videos and taking surveys over here ..
MatyH
Posted: 15 April 2016 11:41:20(UTC)
#28

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I know this is an old thread but I thought I'd throw in my tuppence worth.

It's more than possible to make a good living online and even a very good one.

Forget the schemes and filling out surveys for pennies and think about selling tangible items on the likes of eBay and Amazon to start.

It's very easy to see what sells well on eBay, narrow down a product line you're interested in, find the suppliers and start off small.

I started my current company with less than £500 worth of stock working from home and it grew exponentially from there.

It gets more difficult in terms of the skills you need to learn and the software that you need to manage stock as you grow but it's up to you how far you want to go.

Once you've mastered eBay move onto Amazon and double your revenue in a short time with the same stock and from there websites.

Look after your customers well and this will go a long way towards you achieving success.
1 user thanked MatyH for this post.
dlp6666 on 15/04/2016(UTC)
MatyH
Posted: 15 April 2016 11:44:12(UTC)
#29

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Posted twice somehow
ben ski
Posted: 16 April 2016 19:28:48(UTC)
#30

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First business I ever did out of college was ebay ... Selling designer clothes

A lot of people were doing it then, but always with BuyItNow ... I undercut everyone but used the bid system – and what would often happen is you'd get two people (women mostly, I'm afraid) stuck in a bidding war, pushing the prices way up

Sometimes I had £20 stock go for upwards of £4-500 ... I felt terrible about taking that much money, and would bend over backwards to make sure I at least provided the best service ... Ultimately it was extremely unfulfilling – in many ways the worst of both worlds: making a lot of easy money, yet having a day job that basically involved answering emails and packing parcels
Anna Danishek
Posted: 27 April 2016 12:07:58(UTC)
#32

Joined: 26/04/2016(UTC)
Posts: 11

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a good one - great doubts
Paek Gorn
Posted: 27 April 2016 23:10:16(UTC)
#33

Joined: 26/04/2016(UTC)
Posts: 3

Speaking about trade in the forex market, as earnings on the Interent, then yes, the Internet much you can earn. If such companies like freshforex, hold shares in favor of which the main prize car, it says a lot
Jon Snow
Posted: 27 April 2016 23:19:21(UTC)
#34

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Paek Gorn;32951 wrote:
Speaking about trade in the forex market, as earnings on the Interent, then yes, the Internet much you can earn. If such companies like freshforex, hold shares in favor of which the main prize car, it says a lot


Yeah, I'm in.
Arleen Perez
Posted: 07 July 2016 04:59:13(UTC)
#35

Joined: 04/04/2016(UTC)
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My answer is absolutely yes! I can assure that most of my friends have a big savings while working online. According to them, they usually work at home. The requirements are a good computer and an internet. You will need some basic computer skills. They said, those things will make you adapt to the training given.
ben ski
Posted: 07 July 2016 06:39:49(UTC)
#36

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Funnily enough, I got myself an HLMarkets account not long ago – the spread-betting/trading offshoot of Hargreaves Lansdown

I mainly got it because I'm a trend follower, and because I'm in some pretty overvalued markets ... My aim is to sell out of certain markets when trends start to deteriorate – but if it's too quick (like 1987), this gives me the option to short very easily, and hedge that way

So anyway, learning on the demo account, I couldn't make a bad trade if I tried ... All real, live markets ... I shorted the FTSE 100, went long various commodities, coffee, gold miners – big profits shorting a European Financials ETF ... Making about £400/day, barely touched the £100k deposit – I could've deposited just £200-300 to cover the margin ... When I eventually get a real account: first trade I do I'm quickly stopped out and lose 5% ... It's a strange (and apparently very common) phenomenon ... Almost like poker – when it's fake money, it's just a card game ... When it's real money, it's a betting game
S_M
Posted: 07 July 2016 07:18:13(UTC)
#37

Joined: 17/03/2011(UTC)
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If you are capable of thinking outside the box, and put together the best suggestions that have been made here you could easily make £10k plus a year for very little capital risk.

In my opinion if you have a few hours a day, Matched Betting is by far the most lucrative way of generating an income from a relatively small bank. You can start with a few hundred pounds and build it up to £2-£3k within a few months. You then use this bank to generate an income of anywhere between £500 to £1.5k per month. The only downside with Matched Betting is bookies don't like you winning and eventually restrict accounts, but there are strategies to throw them off your scent. I am a converted Matched Bettor, and used to think it was impossible to beat the "house edge" of bookmakers. Doing it part time has netted me £3.1k so far in 3 months, and I expect to comfortably exceed £10k by the end of this year. It will be quite nice going on holiday, knowing it's at the expense of those pesky bookmakers.

You don't need to be an expert on sports, it's more important to have a grasp of basic maths but there is software that does the calculations for you. The next step for me will be sports trading on betfair, which is not dissimilar to financial trading.

Another way of generating a passive income, is setting up a blog/website and using affiliate marketing to refer readers onto other sites.

Ben you mentioned poker, well it's just about the only form of gambling where there is no house edge. It's you against your opponents, the best players in the long run always come out on top. There is a saying in poker, if you cannot figure out who the fish at the table is over a period of time, its you!


colin overton
Posted: 07 July 2016 08:24:36(UTC)
#38

Joined: 26/04/2008(UTC)
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People make their money in lots of ways. I once worked with an American (for a chemical company) that made his real money (or so it was said) as a professional gambler, he didn't do it for fun. He worked hard at his day job and had a rather stressful senior sales role. Our company gave us interesting but hard tasks and I always wondered why he worked as well as gambled.
Can you make money as a "day-trader"? I've no idea, but I suspect it's a difficult, stressful task with a high failure rate. One occasionally hears of younger, head-strong, usually men who decide to buy and sell stocks etc. on short timescales. I am immediately fearful. Often the news goes quiet and they stop.
I invest to make money, and to have an interest. Overall I believe I have made some money over the years, certainly against the "shoe-box" or Building Soc "benchmark". I have see several large crashes and so in between booms. I have, am and will make mistakes and they are always painful.
I have the feeling it's getting harder to successfully invest in stocks and shares. I have begun to think it's wise to take profits more frequently and whenever in doubt sell - I don't always take my own advice!
I wonder whether I would still be going if I had started in less benign times? I am now more knowledgeable and not as completely unsophisticated (I retired my old pin). Am I more successful or more content with the results, difficult to say. I suspect I would be less risk averse if I began today and perhaps less successful/sanguine.
I would not invest money I may need to spend in the 1-3 years time, in any circumstances.
Alan Selwood
Posted: 07 July 2016 10:01:50(UTC)
#39

Joined: 17/12/2011(UTC)
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Whether investing or trading ( = gambling), if someone says it's easy, you can be sure that either:

a) It's not

or

b) They're confused by the difference between a run of favourable coincidences and skill

or

c) They're trying to sell you something from which they intend to take the profit.

or

They are the ones still solvent (so far) after the others lost all their money (see also b above).
2 users thanked Alan Selwood for this post.
Raj K on 07/07/2016(UTC), Micawber on 07/07/2016(UTC)
S_M
Posted: 07 July 2016 10:05:48(UTC)
#41

Joined: 17/03/2011(UTC)
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Yes but investing/trading isn't the only way of making money online.

It's a much broader subject. As with anything you should do thorough research before making any commitment.
Alan Selwood
Posted: 07 July 2016 10:15:43(UTC)
#42

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S_M:

Yes, I know, but the recent posts seemed to be about trading shares.

There are many people who have online businesses, but it is harder to know which ones succeed long-term, and which ones fold after a few weeks or months when they've exhausted their capital or their patience, or paid too much to Amazon / eBay to handle the admin compared with their profit margin.

Like speciality shops, really. When we see them open in our town, we usually say 'That won't last, it's in the wrong place' / 'too specialised to get enough footfall', etc. Sadly, we are rarely wrong.......!
Micawber
Posted: 07 July 2016 11:54:44(UTC)
#43

Joined: 27/01/2013(UTC)
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Ah, that depends on how specialised they are and (above all) the quality. We've had at least four shops in our village that did very well and later expanded/moved away. One specialised in aromatic oils before they became fashionable, and rode the surge to become a bigger warehouse and business. Another run by a former Olympian specialised in hockey, and customers came from all over southern England to shop there because they had the right stuff plus advice; another clothes-printing business with a good designer, and another tennis specialist.
ben ski
Posted: 07 July 2016 19:43:13(UTC)
#40

Joined: 15/01/2016(UTC)
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Alan Selwood;35008 wrote:
Whether investing or trading ( = gambling), if someone says it's easy, you can be sure that either:

a) It's not

or

b) They're confused by the difference between a run of favourable coincidences and skill

or

c) They're trying to sell you something from which they intend to take the profit.

or

They are the ones still solvent (so far) after the others lost all their money (see also b above).


Trading is an interesting one ..

Undoubtedly most people do very poorly (I believe the average DIY trader returns nothing after fees) – charts show retail investors making all the wrong decisions on when to buy and sell

Almost whenever you see claims of people making $500k/year day-trading, they're trying to sell an e-book

But there's a lot from trading which you can apply to make you a better investor (for example momentum and trend-following have taken a long time for academia to really acknowledge can give normal investors a systematic advantage)

And what's interesting is when you study the trades of George Soros, or even typical traders with above average records (as in The Art of Execution), the best performers aren't necessarily right any more often than chance ... George Soros bases trades on back aches and often quite esoteric thinking – and is often wrong about things ... But it seems to be entirely be down to a systematic way they approach trades that simply wins out over speculators and people driven by emotions over any significant period of time ... I mentioned trading on a demo account made me feel like I should be earning a £6bn bonus at a hedge fund – but the real thing has some subtle influence on behaviour that suddenly seems to make it very difficult to do well ... But the way the markets got Brexit wrong – I don't subscribe to the idea you're dealing with a particularly smart opponent

Annika Small
Posted: 08 July 2016 03:34:56(UTC)
#44

Joined: 08/07/2016(UTC)
Posts: 2

There is no such thing as easy money. Either way you have to invest time, effort and money. It takes hard work really.
Arleen Perez
Posted: 08 July 2016 13:36:10(UTC)
#51

Joined: 04/04/2016(UTC)
Posts: 10

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I heard about scams that you can earn 45 dollars per hour by just "click and drop". Lol
S_M
Posted: 11 July 2016 07:54:36(UTC)
#45

Joined: 17/03/2011(UTC)
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Annika Small;35051 wrote:
There is no such thing as easy money. Either way you have to invest time, effort and money. It takes hard work really.


If time effort and money equals a £23 pm subscription to a site that has now yielded £3.5k for me in 3 months doing something I love ie watching sport, I will take that. It's almost a hobby. But let the masses remain sceptical ehhh!!
huudi
Posted: 12 July 2016 08:23:25(UTC)
#52

Joined: 11/06/2010(UTC)
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Hi Amber,
from experience this was easier 25 years ago, scams always existed but the internet has made them commonplace. If you want time to yourself then invest in I.T.'s, long-term bonds, etc that pay rates above inflation, there have been very few shares that not 'crashed' at sometime and they will be a constant worry.
Since George offered to back-up cheap mortgages with 'our' money, the interest on savings has slumped to less than mortgage costs. This should be unsustainable but government intervention has pushed rates down &house prices up, ie:- normal supply & demand is not working because taxpayers cash is now used by mortgagers, this will only change when the coffers are empty.
There are two things to consider, how much income you need and how much you capital you have, it needs a lot these days to lead more than a frugal life.

huudi

ps Jeremy B, enjoy the OAP, it takes weight of your shoulders!
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