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lynne shaffer
Posted: 16 August 2017 11:37:38(UTC)

Joined: 15/03/2011(UTC)
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I sold VMID today as I don't think the outlook medium term is particularly bright.
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Mr Helpful on 16/08/2017(UTC)
Tony Peterson
Posted: 16 August 2017 11:39:25(UTC)

Joined: 10/08/2009(UTC)
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S_M

Congratulations. You have made around the same percentage gain with Purplebricks as I have made from Rio Tinto over roughly the same period. Did you get juicy dividends as well?

The financial service industry loves meaningless mantras. Growth stocks outperform income stocks! Well, I never! Surely that is what the name implies. But there are no mantras, nor statistics, for growth stocks versus income stocks with dividends reinvested in whatever company is, on the dividend day, the optimal place to invest. You cannot collect statistics like that.

Of course our dividend haul through the summer months is a reflection of the size of our equity portfolio. How on earth do you think I managed to grow it to a level I still find hard to believe given our modest lifetime earnings?

You answer that, and I will answer another question you asked on a different thread. I have refrained because I do not want to hurt feelings.
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Guest on 16/08/2017(UTC)
S_M
Posted: 16 August 2017 12:15:30(UTC)

Joined: 17/03/2011(UTC)
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Tony Peterson;49858 wrote:
S_M

Congratulations. You have made around the same percentage gain with Purplebricks as I have made from Rio Tinto over roughly the same period. Did you get juicy dividends as well?

The financial service industry loves meaningless mantras. Growth stocks outperform income stocks! Well, I never! Surely that is what the name implies. But there are no mantras, nor statistics, for growth stocks versus income stocks with dividends reinvested in whatever company is, on the dividend day, the optimal place to invest. You cannot collect statistics like that.

Of course our dividend haul through the summer months is a reflection of the size of our equity portfolio. How on earth do you think I managed to grow it to a level I still find hard to believe given our modest lifetime earnings?

You answer that, and I will answer another question you asked on a different thread. I have refrained because I do not want to hurt feelings.



Tony, Purplebricks was a huge error from me. I got stopped out on my first purchase when they fell back towards issue price last year. My returns come from purchases earlier this year around the £2 mark, had I not been so stupid last year I would be looking at pretty much 300% or more. How often are you genuinely disappointed in doubling your money in a matter of months though?

The Financial Services industry does not spin growth stocks outperforming their income yielding counterparts. They are facts.

With regards to your portfolio, you could have easily put it in SMT(or similar global stock market managed funds) for 20 years and achieved similar gains with half the hassle.

Tony Peterson
Posted: 16 August 2017 12:39:43(UTC)

Joined: 10/08/2009(UTC)
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S_M

Utter dishonest rubbish. You do not know what our initial investment inputs were.

However, you tried to answer my question. So here is my response to your insistence that I do not know the difference between an independent financial adviser and a tied adviser.

They are as different as mosquitoes are from leeches. Both are bloodsucking parasites. The Independent Financial Adviser is not tied to a particular company and can thus offer a wider range of products. Although I have never met one, I deduce from angry comments on this forum that many are independent of ethics, morality, veracity and integrity and far from operating in their clients' best interests, keep a sharp eye on their own.

Leeches can have medical benefits, but mosquitoes carry terrible diseases. Like the mantras spouted about the benefit of funds.

You would certainly not have been giving me good advice when we started to invest judging by your present comments.

The first rule of successful investing has to be cut out middlemen. The second, invest in companies you know and use. Build up your stake and invest dividends sensibly. You know the benefits of being your own fund manager, but how many high net worth clients have you told that to? No.? Rather like the price comparison websites which never quote the best tariff because they get no commission from them.



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Tim D on 16/08/2017(UTC)
RWM
Posted: 16 August 2017 12:45:30(UTC)

Joined: 15/12/2016(UTC)
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Tony Peterson;49860 wrote:
S_M

Utter dishonest rubbish. You do not know what our initial investment inputs were.

However, you tried to answer my question. So here is my response to your insistence that I do not know the difference between an independent financial adviser and a tied adviser.

They are as different as mosquitoes are from leeches. Both are bloodsucking parasites. The Independent Financial Adviser is not tied to a particular company and can thus offer a wider range of products. Although I have never met one, I deduce from angry comments on this forum that many are independent of ethics, morality, veracity and integrity and far from operating in their clients' best interests, keep a sharp eye on their own.

Leeches can have medical benefits, but mosquitoes carry terrible diseases. Like the mantras spouted about the benefit of funds.

You would certainly not have been giving me good advice when we started to invest judging by your present comments.

The first rule of successful investing has to be cut out middlemen. The second, invest in companies you know and use. Build up your stake and invest dividends sensibly. You know the benefits of being your own fund manager, but how many high net worth clients have you told that to? No.? Rather like the price comparison websites which never quote the best tariff because they get no commission from them.





Tony - whilst some of us obviously don't have the same investment style / preference as you do, I'm sure we would all be very interested in the composition of your portfolio by investment. Would this be something you would be willing to share? No need to assign monetary values - even percentage allocations would be very informative and insightful.
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Jeff Liddiard on 16/08/2017(UTC), Freddy4Skin on 16/08/2017(UTC)
Jeff Liddiard
Posted: 16 August 2017 15:30:16(UTC)

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srg751;49849 wrote:
[quote=Micawber;49831
btw for longer term investors wanting to tuck away a small play, maybe for a child/grandchild, Sirius minerals is looking fairly cheap again at 27p. I think it's simply lack of newsflow, for as far as I can see the polyhalite mine project is on schedule and on budget.






Morning Micawber, have you looked at WJG ? I posted with a ref around January when someone asked for a 'non too racy' investment. It's up around 50% since then. I've just moved it out of the fun pf into my serious holdings. They operate across the entire development lifecycle from site procurement, planning and construction to scheme management.
The 'actual' divi is around the 3.5% mark,as opposed to the headline div posted on platforms...... ( You know what I mean !) and increases to nearly 4% early next year. They also endeavour to maintain a 'low risk' business/es model/s.

RE Sirius;
I've been in and out of SXX several times but I can't rest easy knowing that a production delay or a rumour, as with any early phase commodity stock, can take you down. Totally agree with the ' for grandkids to tuck away' though. Absolutely.[/quote]


srg

Do you have a view on CLLN as a punt now it's down to .50p?

Please keep the ideas coming!
srg751
Posted: 16 August 2017 15:50:27(UTC)

Joined: 10/08/2013(UTC)
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Hi Jeff.
CLLN just seems to step out of one pile into another so it's not a business that I would invest in. The back room don't seem to be able to carry out a proper audit, leaving shareholders in the dark, or worse, as has been the case recently, wrongly informed. If I were looking for a company in the same (ish) sector I'd probably go for GFRD. It's got more strings to its bow, and more or less in charge of its own destiny
Obviously everything has its price so there will become a time when CLLN is worth a punt. For me, if ever I thought that that time had come,it would only be a trade for a quick profit. If I held it, would I sell? Yes, because of all the unknowns, and the negativity .
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Jeff Liddiard on 16/08/2017(UTC)
King Lodos
Posted: 16 August 2017 15:56:05(UTC)

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Mr Helpful;49856 wrote:
King Lodos;49826 wrote:
Mr Helpful;49806 wrote:
Investment climate for Stocks proper, seems probably more suited to harvesting, rather than taking on new positions ?
See Lord Roschild mentioned in paper Tuesday murmuring in similar vein about reducing the RCP exposure to 'listed equities'.


Seasonal trends, political risk and valuations would certainly support that.

But to some extent I've been feeling that for at least the past three years – in fact I think the number of people predicting crashes has gone down, as memories of the Financial Crisis fade and we get habituated to rising markets.

Ray Dalio agrees Fed tightening will necessitate getting out – but also seems to think the economy may be in the sweet spot that gives us the second stage of this bull market .. I think we're still a long way from the euphoria we'd expect of a market top .. And looking at valuations on things like Lazard Emerging Markets (P/Es around 10, PEGs around 0.8?), baring unforeseen catastrophe, you can imagine being underexposed could be a mistake too


Exactly !
The wider market valuation measures in particular have for some time now conflicted as to just how expensive markets might be. Individual positions also conflict to some degree, but today find very few of those positions screaming on the radar "buy me , I am cheap!".
And for those few that do am already sufficiently invested, thank you!

Reluctant (as per your view) to drop below an already very defensive 25% Stocks in liquid portfolio.
Today did find top-slicing of SCF (UK income) advantageous.


See I'm certainly feeling that way about most Developed Markets now – I've probably been doing more selling than buying for a while.

But I think S.Korea's still screamingly cheap – PEs around 10 by some measures – and Russia's getting really cheap again .. I've been buying Vanguard Emerging Mkts stock index too .. To the point I'm about 1/3rd Emerging Mkts in my Stocks allocation .. Trying to tread a line between Value and Momentum .. I tend to be roughly 1/3rd directly in the market (even if it's all small-caps and EM), 1/3rd hedged (corporate bonds, hedge funds) and 1/3rd cash.




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Guest on 16/08/2017(UTC)
Jeff Liddiard
Posted: 16 August 2017 16:14:56(UTC)

Joined: 20/01/2012(UTC)
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srg751;49869 wrote:

Hi Jeff.
CLLN just seems to step out of one pile into another so it's not a business that I would invest in. The back room don't seem to be able to carry out a proper audit, leaving shareholders in the dark, or worse, as has been the case recently, wrongly informed. If I were looking for a company in the same (ish) sector I'd probably go for GFRD. It's got more strings to its bow, and more or less in charge of its own destiny
Obviously everything has its price so there will become a time when CLLN is worth a punt. For me, if ever I thought that that time had come,it would only be a trade for a quick profit. If I held it, would I sell? Yes, because of all the unknowns, and the negativity .



srg

Thanks for the reply, appreciated. GFRD is on my watchlist (probably suggested by you previously). I'm not looking for any particular sector, just looking for anything really for a punt for the fun portfolio.
srg751
Posted: 16 August 2017 16:44:21(UTC)

Joined: 10/08/2013(UTC)
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Jeff Liddiard;49871 wrote:
[quote


srg

Thanks for the reply, appreciated. GFRD is on my watchlist (probably suggested by you previously). I'm not looking for any particular sector, just looking for anything really for a punt for the fun portfolio.




My choice would be Watkin Jones. They buy the land, build the dwellings, let them out and manage the estates.
4 businesses for the price of one. ( they're much more than a 'construction' company). 3.5% divi rising to 4% next year.
GL.
2 users thanked srg751 for this post.
Jeff Liddiard on 16/08/2017(UTC), Bellabeck on 16/08/2017(UTC)
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