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Euphoria
Jon Snow
Posted: 16 February 2017 00:57:30(UTC)
#43

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When climbing a mountain (like what I did a long time ago) at what point do you feel euphoric -

when you look back and think, wow, we climbed that.

When you look forward and think, just another 100m and we're there.

When you think Jack's Rake, jeezus I did that and I'm still here.

When you climb that 100m and realise you're not there yet.

When you're on the top and you see that view and you add your stone, then you see, in the distance...

Onward and upwards, it has to be the only way.
Micawber
Posted: 16 February 2017 04:39:31(UTC)
#44

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How about: when the oxygen starts to get thin.
kWIKSAVE
Posted: 16 February 2017 07:32:03(UTC)
#45

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===========================
CUEBALL;43170 wrote:

For our younger viewer Mr Marvin used to front a band called the Shadow's.

With Bruce Welch, Tony Bennet and....?

The theme should be Frightened City perhaps.... (or you and Tony P might go for Wonderful Land)
========================================

Those were the days Cuey.

My first 45 was Geronimo ( B side Shazan) ; still got it somewhere ..... a good investment perhaps ?
CUEBALL
Posted: 16 February 2017 08:32:48(UTC)
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Rishan;43234 wrote:
I'm certainly not euphoric, although I know what is meant by the phrase. I feel completely locked out of the market and frustrated, having sold things too early and needing to use the CGT allowance for next year's ISA. I don't understand why it's just going up and up at this rate with all the rubbish happening in the world. Maybe I should just give up because I have completely missed the boat now. I don't have the time, and clearly don't have the patience to be a good investor. I will end up investing my ISA allowance in April in things that are very expensive and then watch them return nothing, or lose 50% in the ensuing crash. Does anyone else feel the same at this point?


One expensive lesson I learned very early in life...When the 'big boy's come out to play ..unless your near the front of the queue you're 'gonna' have a long wait for your ice cream.
Sara G
Posted: 16 February 2017 08:47:53(UTC)
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Alan Selwood;43246 wrote:
If the market seems toppy, it may continue to be so for ages. It may also rise further. Equally, it may fall back a bit or a lot. Or do nothing.

We don't know, and nobody can tell us which or when.

If you hold lots of cash but would like to invest it (but fear drops), the usual suggestion is to make phased purchases over months or even years and diversify as much as you possibly can, and try to buy on 'dull days' when temporary euphoria is missing. I have found, however, that when I feel most inclined to follow this mantra, markets usually go up!

Temper excessive caution and over-optimism. Neither will be the most likely outcome.

Try to assess how big a drop in the market(s) you could be comfortable with and invest your cash accordingly.

Aim to buy what will almost certainly survive but is currently not loved by the majority of investors.


Some stocks / sectors are very unloved at the moment...

http://www.iii.co.uk/art...hares-brave-contrarians

Individual shares and ITs on wide discounts may offer the best opportunities for bargain hunters when markets generally feel relatively expensive.

Otherwise drip-feeding makes sense - just stick with regular monthly contributions into decent funds / ITs. The question is not when markets will fall, but what will they look like in 10 years' time? (Or whatever your investment horizon is). Today's price may look like a bargain one day!
2 users thanked Sara G for this post.
Mickey on 16/02/2017(UTC), Keith Cobby on 16/02/2017(UTC)
Micawber
Posted: 23 February 2017 09:11:11(UTC)
#46

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As I always have macroeconomic and geopolitical considerations in mind as background to portfolio decisions, I find the monthly Barclays overviews useful, well written and cogent. (in the US, I read Wells Fargo's offerings). 17 Feb Barclays here: https://www.barclaysstoc.../556/in-focus-170217.pdf
2 users thanked Micawber for this post.
dyfed on 23/02/2017(UTC), Guest on 23/02/2017(UTC)
dyfed
Posted: 23 February 2017 09:28:16(UTC)
#47

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Not much euphoria in eurozone: I see the torygraph has 2 high profile articles about it's bust up today - I know it's their favourite theme but there is a lot of risky sounding stuff at the moment - italian banks, greece, Le Pen. I'm thinking about top slicing the gains on some of my european funds (and selling any remaining euro denominated funds).....
I'm starting to have too much cash: don't fancy US, nor Europe, already got a fair amount in Japan and Emerging markets.....UK anyone?
King Lodos
Posted: 23 February 2017 09:44:23(UTC)
#49

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I think US Value is still a reasonable place to buy .. The US is still the best looking economy – so if it's just valuations making us nervous, stick to the cheap end of the market (US Value sailed through the 2000-2003 crash).

I've still been buying Investec Global Special Situations (benchmarked against the FTSE World Value I seem to recall), average P/E a reasonable 15 or so, with some quality companies like Microsoft and exposure to Financials.

Otherwise it's high-yield bonds for me. And Russia. (I read a fund manager saying he'd sold Russia the other day – fully valued? Doesn't look it to me – by a long shot – but worth getting another perspective perhaps.)
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dyfed on 23/02/2017(UTC)
Micawber
Posted: 23 February 2017 09:45:23(UTC)
#48

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dyfed;43604 wrote:
Not much euphoria in eurozone: I see the torygraph has 2 high profile articles about it's bust up today - I know it's their favourite theme but there is a lot of risky sounding stuff at the moment - italian banks, greece, Le Pen. I'm thinking about top slicing the gains on some of my european funds (and selling any remaining euro denominated funds).....
I'm starting to have too much cash: don't fancy US, nor Europe, already got a fair amount in Japan and Emerging markets.....UK anyone?


Whereas I find the circling europhobe vultures at the Telegraph drearily predictable, and am thinking of increasing my 12% weighting to Europe but perhaps not until Le Pen is out of the way. Meanwhile our excellent TRG is up more than 13% since Christmas
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dyfed on 23/02/2017(UTC)
dyfed
Posted: 23 February 2017 10:24:33(UTC)
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King Lodos;43607 wrote:

Otherwise it's high-yield bonds for me.



Which are u buying? I have CMHY and NCYF plus a bit of Artemis Strategic.
Oh, forgot also hold floating note stuff mainly US: ACSF and AFT, AEFS and NBLS
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Mr Helpful on 24/02/2017(UTC)
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